What is a Revelization?

Dear Reader, 

I'd like to tell you the story of the title I've given this newsletter: Revelizations

I was a religious studies major in college. I was drawn to it because I was trying to find the thing - the thing that made people tick, the thing that caused actions in the world, the thing that would help me understand everything else.  

When I started college, I thought the thing was politics. Understanding how communities govern themselves seemed to me to be the thing that drove so many decisions that impacted so many lives.

And then I got a bit jaded with politics and I took a Buddhism course. 

I have a master's degree in religious studies, but I didn't specialize in any one religion. I invested much of my studies reading and thinking about the study of religion. I spent my time thinking about how communities tell stories; how people work really hard to make sense of the world around them; and how human desires across continents and centuries are remarkably similar and yet, because they show up in so many very different ways, they end up looking irreconcilable. This learning has very little to do with religion in particular. In fact, I gave a master's defense that was in part about why religious studies should not be its own academic discipline.
 

When I had the ah-ha moment that led to the master's defense, I came up with a new term: revelization. It is a term for the type of understanding that feels divinely-inspired, if you are a religious person, and feels special in a self-empowering way if you aren't. A realization is benign. You can realize that you are wearing two different color socks. A revelation, in a theological context, is something bigger than you- it is something you are being shown, something that is communicated to you.

A revelization then, as I've defined it, is when you realize something that changes your worldview. It is when you acquire new knowledge that somehow feels profound. You make the discovery, but it feels bigger than you.
 

My hope for this newsletter is that every once in a while it leads to you a revelization. I hope to compile interesting reads, or listens (I'm in love with podcasts), that shake you up a bit or add a new dimension to something you've been thinking about for a long time. 

That's what I want for my communications strategy and consulting work as well. I want to help bring about new understandings, new knowledge, that actually lead to good work in the world. I believe that great communication has that potential.

What I ask from you, dear reader, is that if you are struck by something I've sent you, you let me know. If you've had a revelization lately, I want to hear about it. Send me a one-sentence email, a tweet, a text. Let's communicate. 

Best, 
Aimee


And, of course, if you have a project you'd like to work on together, I'd love to connect